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Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures


Dorothea Lange. Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California. March 1936. Gelatin silver print, 11 1/8 x 8 9/16″ (28.3 x 21.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

February 9 – May 9, 2020

 

The Museum of Modern Art

The Museum of Modern Art presents Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures, the first major solo exhibition at the Museum of the photographer’s incisive work in over 50 years. The exhibition includes approximately 100 photographs drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection. Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures also uses archival materials such as correspondence, historical publications, and oral histories, as well as contemporary voices, to examine the ways in which words inflect our understanding of Lange’s pictures. These new perspectives and responses from artists, scholars, critics, and writers, including Julie Ault, Wendy Red Star, and Rebecca Solnit, provide fresh insight into Lange’s practice. Further Information www.moma.org

 

Copyright Text: MoMA

The Shed Announces New Artist Commissions for 2020 Season

First-Ever Open House, Meet at The Shed, On January 11

Further Information https://theshed.org/

Copyright Text/Video: The Shed


Whitney Museum of American Art

Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945

Februar 17 - May 17, 2020

 

Mexico underwent a radical cultural transformation at the end of its Revolution in 1920. A new relationship between art and the public was established, giving rise to art that spoke directly to the people about social justice and national life. The model galvanized artists in the United States who were seeking to break free of European aesthetic domination to create publicly significant and accessible native art. Numerous American artists traveled to Mexico, and the leading Mexican muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—spent extended periods of time in the United States, executing murals, paintings, and prints; exhibiting their work; and interacting with local artists. With approximately 300 works by eighty-five Mexican and American artists, Vida Americana will demonstrate the impact Mexican artists had on their counterparts in the United States during this period and the ways in which their example inspired American artists both to create epic narratives about American history and everyday life, and to use their art to protest economic, social, and racial injustices.

 

Copyright Image:

Alfredo Ramos Martínez. Calla Lily Vendor (Vendedora de Alcatraces), 1929. Oil on canvas, 45 13/16 × 36 in. (116.3 × 91.4 cm). Private collection. © The Alfredo Ramos Martínez Research Project, reproduced by permission 

 

 

Harold Lehman, The Driller (mural, Rikers Island, New York), 1937. Tempera on fiberboard, 92 1/8 × 57 1/8 in. (233.9 × 145 cm). Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC; transfer from the Newark Museum 1966.31.11. © Estate of Harold Lehman. Image: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC / Art Resource, NY

 

 

Jackson Pollock, Landscape with Steer, c. 1936–37. Lithograph with airbrushed enamel additions, sheet: 16 1/8 × 23 3/8 in. (41 × 59.3 cm); image: 13 13/16 × 18 9/16 in. (35.1 × 47.1 cm). Museum of Modern Art, New York; gift of Lee Krasner Pollock. © 2019 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Image © The Museum of Modern Art/Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

 



Whitney Museum of American Art

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019

Nov 2019 - Jan 2021

 

 

foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft, beginning with works made after World War II when many artists embraced fiber arts and ceramics to challenge the dominance of traditional painting and sculpture. Over the next seven decades, artists have continued to explore techniques such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, and experimented with textiles, thread, clay, and beads, among other mediums. These works speak to artists’ interests in domesticity, hobbyist materials, the decorative, vernacular American traditions, “women’s work,” and feminist and queer aesthetics. By employing marginalized modes of artistic production, they challenge the power structures that determine artistic value.

Drawn primarily from the Whitney’s collection, the exhibition will encompass over eighty works by more than sixty artists, including Ruth Asawa, Eva Hesse, Mike Kelley, Liza Lou, Howardena Pindell, Robert Rauschenberg, Elaine Reichek, and Lenore Tawney, as well as featuring new acquisitions by Shan Goshorn, Kahlil Robert Irving, Simone Leigh, Jordan Nassar, and Erin Jane Nelson.

Further Information https://whitney.org/

 

 

Copyright Image: Liza Lou (b. 1969), Kitchen, 1991-96. Beads, plaster, wood, and found objects, 96 x 132 x 168 in. (243.8 x 335.3 x 426.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Peter Norton 2008.339a-x. Photograph by Tom Powel. © Liza Lou

Copyright Text: Whitney Museum of American Art, New York